Raymond Cote

pCell demonstration at Columbia 

Mobile Bandwidth Revolution

- Massively breaks through physics based bandwidth limits
- Small attractive Cells transceivers can be place almost anywhere 
- Can be deployed incrementally in parallel to present cell technologies
- Full Cell bandwidth available to every user
- Cells and mobile devices use much less power
- Works with present mobile phone devices
- Work over mobile, other and even unassigned spectrums
- Can out perform DSL and traditional cable to deliver home internet



Introduction to the Wolfram Language

An Ultra-High-Level Programing Language

A world wide web for robots to learn from each other and share information is being shown off for the first time… . .

"At its core RoboEarth is a world wide web for robots: a giant network and database repository where robots can share information and learn from each other," said Rene van de Molengraft, the RoboEarth project leader… . .

"Everyday changes that happen all the time in our environment make all the programmed actions unusable."

The aim of the system is to create a kind of ever-changing common brain for robots.

"A task like opening a box of pills can be shared on RoboEarth, so other robots can also do it without having to be programmed for that specific type of box," 

‘As much as I like using Twitter, the possibility of a single entity being able to control this important flux of information made no sense to me’
— Miguel Freitas

DavidJohnstonCEO/DecentralizedApplications · GitHub</>

Emerging technologies

for disrupting the Banksters !

“I cannot imagine a more ‘indiscriminate’ and ‘arbitrary’ invasion than this systematic and high-tech collection and retention of personal data on virtually every single citizen for purposes of querying and analyzing it without prior judicial approval,” Judge Leon wrote. “Surely, such a program infringes on ‘that degree of privacy’ that the founders enshrined in the Fourth Amendment.”

image

U.S. Internet Users Pay More

for Slower Service

the U.S. is rapidly losing the global race for high-speed connectivity, as fewer than 8 percent of households have fiber service. And almost 30 percent of the country still isn’t connected to the Internet at all… .

The FCC’s National Broadband Plan of March 2010 suggested that the minimum appropriate speed for every American household by 2020 should be 4 megabits per second for downloads and 1 Mbps for uploads. These speeds are enough, the FCC said, to reliably send and receive e-mail, download Web pages and use simple video conferencing… .

The South Korean government announced a plan to install 1 gigabit per second of symmetric fiber data access in every home by 2012. Hong Kong, Japan and the Netherlands are heading in the same direction. Australia plans to get 93 percent of homes and businesses connected to fiber. In the U.K., a 300 Mbps fiber-to-the-home service will be offered on a wholesale basis… .

The current 4 Mbps Internet access goal is unquestionably shortsighted. It allows the digital divide to survive, and ensures that the U.S. will stagnate…

Think of it this way: With a dialup connection, backing up 5 gigabytes of data (now the standard free plan offered by many storage companies) would take 20 days… . with a cable DOCSIS 3.0 connection, an hour and a half… . With a gigabit fiber-to-the-home connection, it can be done in less than a minute…

a Hollywood blockbusters could be downloaded in 12 seconds,  video conferencing would become routine, and every household could see 3D and Super HD images. Americans could be connected instantly to their co-workers, their families, their teachers and their health-care monitors…

To make this happen, though, the U.S. needs to move to a utility model, based on the assumption that all Americans require fiber-optic Internet access at reasonable prices. …

As things stand, the U.S. has the worst of both worlds: no competition and no regulation.

Read full article by Susan Crawford @ bloomberg.com

Network Literacy Part 1

I’ve become convinced that understanding how networks work is an essential 21st century literacy. This is the first in a series of short videos about how the structure and dynamics of networks influences political freedom, economic wealth creation, and participation in the creation of culture. The first video introduces the importance of understanding networks and explains how the underlying technical architecture of the Internet specifically supports the freedom of network users to innovate.
- Howard Rheingold 

Network Literacy Part One 2

-



Networking technologies visualized as extensions

of our basic biological cognitive scaffolding

The National Research Council defines Network Science as:

"the study of network representations of physical, biological, and social phenomena leading to predictive models of these phenomena.

THINKING IN NETWORK TERMS

- by Albert-László Barabási

(moving towards - Organic Process Literacy)

We always lived in a connected world, except we were not so much aware of it. We were aware of it down the line, that we’re not independent from our environment, that we’re not independent of the people around us. We are not independent of the many economic and other forces. But for decades we never perceived connectedness as being quantifiable, as being something that we can describe, that we can measure, that we have ways of quantifying the process. That has changed drastically in the last decade, at many, many different levels.

It has changed partly because we started to be aware of it partly because there were a lot of technological advances that forced us to think about connectedness. We had Worldwide Web, which was all about the links connecting information. We had the Internet, which was all about connecting devices. We had wireless technologies coming our way. Eventually, we had Google, we had Facebook. Slowly, the term ‘network connectedness’ really became part of our life so much so that now the word ‘networks’ is used much more often than evolution or quantum mechanics. It’s really run over it, and now that’s the buzzword.

The question is, what does it mean to be part of the network, or what does it mean to think in terms of the network? What does it mean to take advantage of this connectedness and to understand that? In the last decade, what I kept thinking about is how do you describe mathematically the connectedness? How do you get data to describe that? What does this really mean for us?

Read the full post @ edge.org/conversation/thinking-in-network-terms

"Disrupting the Marketplace"
Interview with NiQ Lai

Some good advice for the
Ass-Backward CEOs that run
North American’s ISPs

Social Organizing Structures

beyond the

Market vs State

The Internet? We Built That

read full post @ nytimes.com

It’s not enough to say that peer networks are an interesting alternative to states and markets. The state and the market are now fundamentally dependent on peer networks in ways that would have been unthinkable just 20 years ago… .

One reason is that there is a growing number of individuals and organizations who believe the digital success of peer networks can be translated into the “real” world. Peer networks laid the foundation for the scientific revolution during the Enlightenment, via the formal and informal societies and coffeehouse gatherings where new research was shared. The digital revolution has made it clear that peer networks can work wonders in the modern age… .

When we talk about change being driven by mass collaboration, it’s often in the form of protest movements: civil rights or marriage equality. That’s a tradition worth celebrating, but it’s only part of the story. The Internet (and all the other achievements of peer networks) is not a story about changing people’s attitudes or widening the range of human tolerance. It’s a story, instead, about a different kind of organization, neither state nor market, that actually builds things, creating new tools that in turn enhance the way states and markets work.

read full post @ nytimes.com

"Threats & Opportunities for a Faster and Stronger Web" 

Velocity 2012: Albert Wenger, 

Selling you to the highest bidder !

Read full post @ online.wsj.com

The online industry’s data-collection efforts have expanded in the past few years. One reason is the popularity of online auctions, where advertisers buy data about users’ Web browsing…

In real-time bidding, as soon as a user visits a Web page, the visit is auctioned to the highest bidder, based on attributes such as the type of page visited or previous Web browsing by the user.

The bidding is done automatically using computer algorithms. Forrester Research estimates that real-time bidding will constitute 18% of the online display-ad market this year, up from 13% last year.

Read full post @ online.wsj.com